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NIHR Signal A school-based lifestyle intervention didn’t help children avoid unhealthy weight gain
The Healthy Lifestyle Programme delivered to 9-10-year-old school children did not reduce their weight over the course of two years. Around a third remained overweight or obese, the same as in schools that followed the standard syllabus. This trial, funded by the NIHR, assigned schools across Devon to follow a lifestyle programme in Year five. The comprehensive curriculum included drama and activity workshops, personal goal setting and parental involvement. Children made better food choices, b...
NIHR Signal Parental training improves a child’s disruptive behaviours regardless of socio-economic disadvantage or ethnicity
Children from low-income families, or with an unemployed or single parent, benefitted as much as did economically advantaged groups. The Incredible Years programme worked better for children with more severe behaviour problems or a parent with depression. This NIHR-funded review pooled individual-level data for pre-school and primary aged children with persistent disruptive behaviours. The 14 European trials, including eight studies in the UK, took place in diverse settings including schools, c...
NIHR Signal Harm reduction approaches predicted to reduce rates of new hepatitis C infection for people who inject drugs
A combination of providing clean needles and syringes and offering safer oral therapy, such as methadone, reduced the predicted risk of becoming infected with hepatitis C virus by 71%. Providing both services to people who inject drugs was likely to be cost-effective and has the potential to be cost-saving in some parts of the UK, depending on the size of the local population of people who inject drugs and underlying rates of infection. Current services are estimated to save up to £54 mil...
NIHR Signal Intervention delivered in Northern Irish and Scottish schools reduces binge drinking
An alcohol misuse prevention programme reduced the number of 12 to 14-year-old school pupils reporting “binge” drinking 33 months after the course. The difference was 9% compared with usual education (26% vs 17%). The NIHR-funded Steps Towards Alcohol Misuse Prevention Programme (STAMPP) was tested in a large trial in 105 schools in Northern Ireland and Scotland. It involved around 14 lessons spread over two years and a presentation evening with parents to reinforce the school lesso...
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