Latest important health research summarised

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NIHR Signal Atraumatic needles reduce headaches following lumbar puncture

Use of atraumatic needles rather than conventional needles for lumbar puncture more than halves the rate of post-procedure headache. Moreover, this improvement does not come at the expense of procedure success rates.

Lumbar puncture involves inserting a needle in the lower back into the spinal canal to collect cerebrospinal fluid for diagnosis, ... Read More

  • 17 April 2018
  • Signal

NIHR Signal Adding the extra antibiotic rifampicin did not improve cure rates after sepsis

Adding the antibiotic rifampicin did not improve cure rates or reduce deaths for people with bacterial blood infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus. It increased the risk of adverse reactions requiring a change in treatment and the chances of drug interactions.

This NIHR-funded trial is the largest to date on adding rifampicin to standard... Read More

  • 17 April 2018
  • Signal

NIHR Signal Swimming in seawater is linked with an increased chance of some illnesses

People who swim in seawater have almost double the odds of experiencing any illness than people who avoid it. The specific illnesses linked to seawater exposure were ear and gastrointestinal illnesses, but the exact or absolute rates of infection are not available.

Many people enjoy coastal waters for sport and recreation, and it's... Read More

  • 17 April 2018
  • Signal

NIHR Signal Lorazepam confirmed as first-line treatment for stopping prolonged seizures in children

Intravenous lorazepam is as effective as intravenous diazepam for stopping children’s tonic-clonic seizures in hospital. Lorazepam also results in fewer breathing problems than diazepam. Giving antiepileptic drugs intravenously generally stops seizures more quickly than giving the drugs buccally (in the cheek), intranasally (in the nose) or... Read More

  • 17 April 2018
  • Signal

Boy in physical education class

NIHR Signal A school-based obesity prevention programme was ineffective

A school-based healthy lifestyle programme delivered to 6-7-year-old children and their parents made no difference to children’s weight, diet or activity levels. Around 1 in 4 remained overweight or obese.

The NIHR-funded year-long programme was delivered in 54 primary schools in one region of England. Teachers were trained to provide an... Read More

  • 10 April 2018
  • Signal

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